Buyer Beware: People are Complaining that Banana Boat Sunscreen is Resulting in Second Degree Burns

According to CBC News, two mothers have reported cases of second degree burns after using Banana Boat sunscreen for children on their babies. Both cases are now being investigating by Health Canada.

According to CBC News, two mothers have reported cases of second degree burns after using Banana Boat sunscreen for children on their babies. Both cases are now being investigating by Health Canada.

The first case comes from Rebecca Cannon, a mother from Botwood, Newfoundland. Her 14-month-old daughter allegedly burned after using Banana Boat Kids SPF 50 in the aerosol can. She claims that her daughter’s red skin deepened in colour throughout the day, and when she awoke the next day, was swollen and blistered. After taking her daughter to the doctor, she was informed that the redness and blistering was a second-degree burn.

The second case is shockingly similar and came to attention when Caroline Morneau from Caouna, Quebec posted about the issue on her personal Facebook page on May 26. In the post, Morneau claimed that her nine-month-old baby appeared to have a sunburn on his face even though he had been wearing Banana Boat Baby sunscreen, which according to Banana Boat Canada’s website, is SPF 60. The sunburn eventually led to blistering, which Morneau’s doctor informed her was a second-degree burned likely caused by said sunscreen.

Both cases are deeply upsetting, but apparently, aren’t the first of their kind. After some online research, Cannon discovered that her case wasn’t the only involving the popular brand; she found multiple similar complaints.

The burns, however, are being regarded as potential allergic reactions by Banana Boat Sun Care Canada. In an email, the company told CBC News that while they are aware of the discussions regarding burn issues, they would “like to reassure families that all Banana Boat products undergo rigorous testing to ensure safety and quality before they are placed in the market.” In the same email, the brand suggested that skin reactions such as blisters could be caused by a sensitivity to an ingredient in the products, which can be triggered by sun exposure. They are, however, still taking the complaints seriously and are looking into the issue.

You can read more about the cases on CBC News, but be warned of graphic content.

Featured Image: Instagram/@BananaBoatBrand

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